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What Are The Most Diverse Cities In The US?

April 20, 2024 8-minute read

Author: Kaitlin Davis

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In a country as vast and culturally rich as the United States, it's no surprise that there are numerous cities that boast a diverse population. From the bustling streets of New York City to the sun-soaked shores of California, the U.S. offers a wide range of culturally diverse cities to live in.

There are over 19,400 cities in the United States, so if diversity is at the forefront of your mind when you’re deciding where to live, it can be difficult to know where to start your search. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, there’s no need to worry. Rocket Mortgage® used several criteria to find the most diverse cities in America and explored their vibrant communities and the unique experiences they offer.

Where Are The Most Diverse Cities In America Typically Located?

When you think of diverse places, what characteristics come to mind? Do you think of big cities or small towns? The Southern states or the Midwest? When it comes to the distribution of diverse cities, one can observe a pattern. Large cities tend to have a higher degree of racial and ethnic diversity, largely due to their attractiveness to immigrants and the opportunities they offer.

If you’re looking for a diverse mix of people of different ethnicities, languages and age brackets, look no further than these 10 places.

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The 10 Most Diverse Cities In America

Using data from the U.S. Census, we’ve compiled a list of the most diverse cities in the country based on ethnicity, age, marital status, income and language metrics. We did not include religion, sexuality or other diversity metrics when compiling this list, though you may want to make those considerations while conducting your own research. You can find our complete methodology at the end of this article.

Here are the top 10 most diverse cities in the U.S. according to our research.

1. Tampa, Florida

  • Population:
  • Racial composition: Hispanic or Latino: 21% / white alone: 59% / Black or African American alone: 11% / Asian alone: 4% / two or more races: 4%
  • Median income: $59,893
  • Language composition: Only English: 73% / Spanish: 23% / other Indo-European: 2% / Asian and Pacific Island: 2% / other language: 1%

The most diverse city in the U.S., according to our data, is Tampa. Of the 387,050 residents, about 40% are an ethnicity other than white. The diverse racial composition of the city is what has fueled its celebrated Cuban and Latin American culture. Tampa offers a remarkable blend of cultures and cuisines, from Ybor City to the lively festivals celebrating various ethnic groups. Known for its historic cigar factories and Latin-influenced architecture, immigrants, especially those of Southern American descent, are the backbone of this large Floridian city.   

2. Tucson, Arizona

  • Population:
  • Racial composition: Hispanic or Latino: 36% / white alone: 51% / Black or African American alone: 3% / Asian alone: 3% / two or more races: 4% 
  • Median income: $48,058
  • Language composition: Only English: 73% / Spanish: 23% / other Indo-European: 2% / Asian and Pacific Island: 2% / other language: 1%

If you’re looking forward to buying a house in a diverse city with warm weather and plenty of activities, you may want to look at homes in Tucson. Located in the southwestern United States, Tucson showcases the unique blend of Hispanic, Black, Native American and Anglo-American cultures. With its rich history and proximity to the Mexican border, Tucson offers a diverse range of culinary delights, art and traditions. The city's annual All Souls Procession, a vibrant celebration of life and death, is a testament to the deep cultural roots that define Tucson.

3. Las Vegas, Nevada

  • Population:
  • Racial composition: Hispanic or Latino: 31% / white alone: 39% / Black or African American alone: 12% / Asian alone: 10% / two or more races: 5%
  • Median income: $61,356
  • Language composition: Only English: 66% / Spanish: 23% / other Indo-European: 3% / Asian and Pacific Island: 7% / other language: 1%

While Las Vegas may be famous for its glitz and glamour, it’s also home to a remarkably diverse population. With more than 646,700 people, Nevada’s most populous city has active Asian and Hispanic communities, along with a significant African American presence, that contribute to its cultural tapestry. From the bustling Chinatown to the growing Hispanic neighborhoods, Las Vegas offers a unique blend of traditions and experiences.

4. Albuquerque, New Mexico

  • Population:
  • Racial composition: Hispanic or Latino: 48% / white alone: 38% / Black or African American alone: 2% / Asian alone: 2% / two or more races: 3%
  • Median income: $56,366
  • Language composition: Only English: 73% / Spanish: 21% / other Indo-European: 1% / Asian and Pacific Island: 2% / other language: 3%

Nestled in the heart of the Southwest, Albuquerque is a city rich in Native American and Hispanic heritage. The city's annual Balloon Fiesta, where colorful hot air balloons fill the sky, is a celebration of Albuquerque's diverse cultural and artistic offerings. From the traditional adobe architecture to the distinct flavors of New Mexican cuisine, this city embraces its multicultural roots.

5. New York City, New York

  • Population:
  • Racial composition: Hispanic or Latino: 25% / white alone: 43% / Black or African American alone: 15% / Asian alone: 12% / two or more races: 3% 
  • Median income: $70,663
  • Language composition: Only English: 61% / Spanish: 20% / other Indo-European: 11% / Asian and Pacific Island: 7% / other language: 2%

New York City is the largest city in the country and is known internationally as a hub of culture, entertainment and education. As one of the most iconic cities in the world, The Big Apple is a cultural mosaic like no other. With a population representing nearly every corner of the globe, this city offers an eclectic mix of languages, cuisines and traditions. From the bustling streets of Chinatown to the historic neighborhoods of Harlem, New York City’s diverse communities create unparalleled energy and vibrancy.

6. Atlantic City, New Jersey

  • Population: 38,466
  • Racial composition: Hispanic or Latino: 20% / white alone: 54% / Black or African American alone: 14% / Asian alone: 8% / two or more races: 3%
  • Median income: $29,773
  • Language composition: Only English: 73% / Spanish: 16% / other Indo-European: 6% / Asian and Pacific Island: 4% / other language: 1%

While Atlantic City may be famous for its casinos and entertainment, it also boasts a diverse population. The city's close proximity to Philadelphia and New York City attracts people from various ethnic backgrounds. From the African American communities in the Northside to the lively Hispanic neighborhoods, Atlantic City is a melting pot of cultures and experiences.

7. Beaumont, Texas

  • Population: 112,556
  • Racial composition: Hispanic or Latino: 18% / white alone: 52% / Black or African American alone: 24% / Asian alone: 3% / two or more races: 3% 
  • Median income: $49,765
  • Language composition: Only English: 84% / Spanish: 13% / other Indo-European: 1% / Asian and Pacific Island: 2%

Located in Southeast Texas, Beaumont is a city known for its rich cultural history. With a significant African American population, Beaumont has played a vital role in the development of blues and jazz music in the region. The city's annual Juneteenth celebration, commemorating the emancipation of enslaved African Americans, showcases its commitment to diversity and equality.

8. New Orleans, Louisiana 

  • Population: 376,971
  • Racial composition: Hispanic or Latino: 12% / white alone: 48% / Black or African American alone: 33% / Asian alone: 3% / two or more races: 3% 
  • Median income: $45,594
  • Language composition: Only English: 89% / Spanish: 7% / other Indo-European: 2% / Asian and Pacific Island: 2% / other language: 1%

New Orleans, often referred to as the birthplace of jazz, is a city steeped in rich cultural traditions. Known for its strong Creole and Cajun influences, New Orleans offers a unique blend of food, music and architecture. From the bustling streets of the French Quarter to the colorful Mardi Gras celebrations, this city exudes a multicultural charm that is hard to find elsewhere.

9. Greensboro, North Carolina

  • Population: 78,824
  • Racial composition: Hispanic or Latino: 8.4% /white alone: 39.5% /Black or African American alone: 43.1% /Asian alone: 5.3% /two or more races: 4.4%
  • Median income: $51,667
  • Language composition: Only English: 87% /Spanish: 7% /other Indo-European: 2% /Asian and Pacific Island: 2% /other language: 1%

Located in the heart of North Carolina, Greensboro is a city that celebrates its diverse population. With a significant African American community, Greensboro has been a hub for civil rights activism. The city's International Civil Rights Center and Museum, located at the site of the historic Woolworth's lunch counter sit-in, serves as a reminder of Greensboro's commitment to equality and diversity.

10. Napa, California

  • Population: 298,250
  • Racial composition: Hispanic or Latino: 39.6% /white alone: 53% /Black or African American alone: .7% /Asian alone: 2.9% /two or more races: 10.2%
  • Median income: $92,700
  • Language composition: Only English: 66% /Spanish: 27% /other Indo-European: 3% /Asian and Pacific Island: 4% /other language: 0%

Known for its world-class vineyards and picturesque landscapes, Napa is also home to a diverse community. With a significant Hispanic population and a growing Asian community, Napa offers a unique blend of cultures. The city's renowned food and wine scene, combined with its natural beauty, make it a truly diverse and captivating destination.

The Bottom Line: The US Offers Many Culturally Diverse Cities To Live In

If diversity is at the forefront of your mind as you’re deciding where to live, you may want to consider looking into any of the cities we’ve listed. The United States is home to a multitude of culturally diverse places to live. These cities not only showcase the rich tapestry of cultures and traditions, but they also provide opportunities for growth, learning and understanding.

Whether you're seeking a bustling urban experience or a laid-back coastal lifestyle, the diverse cities of America offer something for everyone. However, it’s important to keep in mind that just because a city is diverse does not mean it is inclusive. Inclusivity can look different for each individual, so research state laws, non-inclusive beliefs and current issues before deciding where to settle down.

If you’re ready to buy a home in a diverse city, start the mortgage application process with Rocket Mortgage®.

Methodology: Finding The Most Diverse Cities In America

Rocket HomesSM collected and analyzed the most recent data on six key local metrics to give us insight into which cities are the most diverse. The 337 most populated metro areas analyzed are home to 67.8% of all U.S. residents. A metropolitan area is not just one large city but includes surrounding cities and suburbs. The metrics used in this study include the metro areas’ racial/ethnic diversity, age diversity, income diversity, language diversity, marital status diversity, and industry diversity. We conducted our analysis using the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index method to effectively measure the level of equality among census-designated demographic, socioeconomic and economic groups that make up a metro area’s population. The lower the index score, the more equal groups are to one another for a specific metric. Each metro area’s index score for each metric was individually ranked, and then weights were applied to each metric depending on its individual importance. The final scores were then sorted to produce the final rankings. To create a varied list of cities across the U.S., we removed lower-ranking cities located in the same state. All metrics were from the U.S. Census and based on 2021 ACS 5-year estimates.

 

 

Metric

Weight

Level

Source

Race and ethnicity

30%

City

U.S. Census

Age

23%

City

U.S. Census

Household income

15%

City

U.S. Census

Language(s) spoken at home

12%

City

U.S. Census

Marital status

10%

City

U.S. Census

Industry for employed civilian population aged 16 and older

10%

City

U.S. Census

Metric considered without weight:

Metric

Level

Source

Population

City

U.S. Census

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Kaitlin Davis

Kaitlin Davis is a Detroit native who holds a BA in Print and Online Journalism from Wayne State University. When she’s not writing mortgage, personal finance, or homes content, she enjoys getting involved with her community, traveling, photography and reading.